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  • #424: Gravity Waves & Space Junk: Cosmic Queries Unpacked

    9 JUN 2024 · This episode is brought to you with the support of NordVPN. To check out our exclusive offer, visit https://www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts - you can thank us later... Space Nuts Episode: Space Junk, Gravity Waves, and Solar Eclipses Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this engaging Q&A edition of Space Nuts, where they tackle a variety of intriguing questions from listeners around the globe. Episode Highlights: - **Space Junk**: Pete from Mamong Point raises concerns about the long-term effects of burning up space debris in Earth's atmosphere. Fred discusses the implications and complexities of space junk management, including the concept of "graveyard orbits" and the infamous Point Nemo. - **Gravity Waves**: Philip from Australia, originally from Glasgow, delves into the nature of gravity waves and their composition. Fred explains the concept of spacetime distortion and how gravitational waves propagate through the fabric of the universe. - **Matter and Energy**: Giego from Slovakia questions whether vacuum energy could be converted into matter, creating new matter that wasn't present since the Big Bang. Fred provides a detailed explanation on the conversion of energy to matter and the role of dark energy. - **Solar Eclipses**: Beverly from Texas shares her excitement about witnessing her first total solar eclipse and asks Fred and Andrew about their experiences. Fred recounts his memorable eclipse viewings and the emotional impact of this celestial phenomenon. 00:00:00 This is a Q and a edition of Space Nuts 00:01:09 Fred and Andrew ask two questions about gravity on today's show 00:08:12 In recent weeks, there's been multiple mentions of space debris burning up 00:14:27 NordVPN details: Virtual private network helps protect online activities from hackers and scammers 00:18:05 Could vacuum energy be converted into matter with expanding universe 00:21:27 Beverly from Texas hopes to see a total solar eclipse soon 00:22:16 Fred, how many total eclipses have you seen in person 00:29:54 Episode wrap Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar journey by visiting our website support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. Become a supporter of this podcast:https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support Visit our website: https://www.spacenuts.io Check out our sponsor: https://www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts
    30m 38s
  • #423: Earth-Like Exoplanets & Dyson Spheres: Unveiling New Cosmic Discoveries

    6 JUN 2024 · This episode is brought to you with the support of NordVPN. To check out our exclusive offer, visit https://www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts - you can thank us later... Space Nuts Episode: Earth-Like Exoplanets, Alien Megastructures, and Space NoiseJoin Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this thrilling episode of Space Nuts as they delve into the latest discoveries and challenges in space science. From the discovery of an Earth-like exoplanet to the search for alien megastructures, this episode promises to be a cosmic journey you won't want to miss. Episode Highlights:- Earth-Like Exoplanet Discovery: An Australian-Scottish collaboration has discovered an exoplanet that closely resembles Earth in size and is located in the habitable zone of its star. Learn about its potential for hosting liquid water and the exciting future possibilities for imaging this distant world. - Space Noise Threat to SKA: The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope faces challenges from satellite noise. Fred discusses the efforts to mitigate these issues and the ongoing collaboration between astronomers and the satellite industry to protect this significant investment in radio astronomy. - Search for Alien Megastructures: Could Dyson spheres exist? Fred and Andrew explore the latest research and debate the feasibility of such megastructures, considering the immense material and energy requirements involved. Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar journey by visiting our website support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support Visit our website: https://www.spacenuts.io Check out our sponsor: https://www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts
    33m 6s
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    #423-424 Premium: Earth-Like Exoplanet & Alien Megastructures: New Frontiers Explored

    6 JUN 2024 · Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson for another exciting episode of Space Nuts. This week, we're diving into some stellar discoveries and cosmic conundrums that will leave you starstruck! First up, we explore an Earth-like planet discovered by Australian and Scottish scientists. This exoplanet, located 40 light-years away, sits in the Goldilocks zone of a red dwarf star, making it a tantalising candidate for hosting liquid water. Could this be our new home away from home?Next, we tackle the growing concern of satellite noise and its potential threat to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Fred shares insights from his visit to the UN in Vienna, discussing how astronomers and industry are working together to mitigate this issue. Finally, we delve into the search for Dyson spheres or megastructures in space. An op-ed piece argues why these colossal constructs probably don't exist, but could there still be a chance of finding one? Tune in for these fascinating topics and more on Space Nuts! Visit our website: www.spacenuts.io Check out our sponsor: [Nordpass](https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass) NordVPN: www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts 
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    54m 45s
  • #422: Dim Lights & Dark Matter: Cosmic Questions Answered

    2 JUN 2024 · Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson for another enlightening episode of Space Nuts Q&A. This week, we tackle a variety of listener questions that delve into the fascinating intricacies of space science and astronomy. First, we revisit a question from Alan about the detectability of light at one candle power of an LED in space. Fred breaks down the calculations and assumptions, providing insights into how far such a light source would be visible, even with the Hubble Telescope. Next, Nate from Queensland asks about bolometric luminosity and its implications for predicting changes in stars, such as supernovae. Fred explains the concept of bolometric measurements, the use of bolometers, and whether there's a standard way to predict changes in a star's luminosity. David from Melbourne brings up Hawking radiation and its potential connection to dark matter and dark energy. Fred clarifies the nature of Hawking radiation and discusses recent research linking black holes to dark energy, albeit without involving Hawking radiation. Martin from Maryland poses a question about the hazards of near-light-speed travel for spacecraft and their biospheres. Fred explores the potential dangers, including nuclear interactions and radiation, that could arise from such high-speed travel. Finally, Ryan from Delaware inquires about the feasibility of refuelling or repairing the James Webb Space Telescope. Fred explains the challenges due to its location at the L2 point and the economic considerations that make such missions unlikely. Tune in to this episode of Space Nuts for these intriguing discussions and more. Your questions drive the conversation, so keep them coming! 00:00:00 Professor Fred Watson answers questions on this episode of Space Nuts 00:01:54 How far away could you see one candle power led with the Hubble telescope 00:06:00 Nate from Queensland asks some questions about volumetric luminosity 00:07:20 Bolometric brightness is the brightness of something measured over its whole spectrum 00:13:50 Is hawking radiation anything to do with dark matter or dark energy 00:15:54 What are the major hazards to spacecraft as they approach relativistic speeds 00:21:10 Ryan from Delaware has a question about the James Webb space telescope 00:27:58 Andrew: Thanks to everybody who contributed this week to Space Nuts q and a 00:29:15 This podcast is available on iTunes, Spotify and iHeartRadio Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar journey by visiting our website support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Visit our website: www.spacenuts.io Check out our sponsor: [Nordpass](https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass)
    29m 51s
  • #421: Zebrafish & Cosmic Cold Spots: Swimming Through Space Mysteries

    30 MAY 2024 · Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this captivating episode of Space Nuts as they explore some of the most intriguing phenomena in space science.First up, zebrafish are making waves in orbit! These tiny aquanauts are part of a Chinese space mission on the Tiangong space station. Discover why zebrafish are ideal candidates for space research and what their genetic similarities to humans could reveal about the effects of zero gravity on biological organisms.Next, delve into the mystery of the cold spot in space, a peculiar anomaly within the cosmic microwave background radiation. Fred explains the significance of this cold spot, its potential causes, and why it challenges our understanding of the universe's isotropy. Could a giant cosmic void be the culprit, or is there another explanation lurking in the cosmos?Additionally, the duo discusses the exciting progress of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory, featuring the world's largest digital camera, which promises to revolutionise our view of the night sky. Learn about its remarkable capabilities and the potential discoveries it could unveil, including the elusive Planet Nine. 00:00:00 This is space nuts, where we talk astronomy and space science 00:01:54 The camera for the Vera C. Rubin telescope telescope has been delivered 00:07:19 Zebrafish on Chinese space station for research into effects of space on fish 00:12:46 Andrew Dunkley: Scientists trying to make aquariums in space self-sustainable 00:15:22 Fred says there's a cold spot in space caused by cosmic microwave background radiation 00:24:00 Cold spots in the cosmic microwave background radiation are not unusual 00:29:27 There's so much going on in the world of space Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar journey by visiting our website support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Visit our website: www.spacenuts.io Check out our sponsor: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass
    30m 13s
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    #421-422 Premium: Zebrafish in Space & Cosmic Cold Spots

    30 MAY 2024 · Space Nuts Episode: Zebrafish in Space & Cosmic MysteriesJoin Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they explore the wonders of the universe in this episode of Space Nuts. From the world's smallest astronauts to the mysteries of the cosmic microwave background, this episode promises to ignite your curiosity and expand your cosmic knowledge. Episode Highlights:- Zebrafish in Space: Discover why zebrafish are orbiting in the Chinese space station Tiangong and what their genetic similarity to humans could reveal about long-term space travel. - The Cold Spot Mystery: Dive into the enigma of the cold spot in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Why is it there, and what could it mean for our understanding of the universe? - Vera C. Rubin Telescope: Learn about the delivery of the 3200-megapixel camera to the Vera C. Rubin Observatory and its potential to revolutionise our understanding of the cosmos. 00:00:00" This is space nuts, where we talk astronomy and space science 00:00:56" Professor Fred Watson says the weather is starting to chill down in Britain 00:01:54" The 3200 megapixel camera for the Vera C. Rubin telescope has been delivered 00:07:21" Zebrafish are on a chinese mission exploring effects of space on fish 00:12:46" Scientists trying to make aquariums in space self-sustainable 00:15:20" Fred says there's a cold spot in space caused by cosmic microwave background radiation 00:24:05" Cold spots in the cosmic microwave background radiation are not unusual 00:28:46" Professor Fred Watson with Andrew Dunkley on Space Nuts Q and A 00:30:31" Alan asked how far away could Hubble telescope detect one candle power led 00:34:37" This week's audio question comes from Nate from Queensland 00:35:57" Bolometric brightness is the brightness of something measured over its whole spectrum 00:42:27" Is hawking radiation anything to do with dark matter or dark energy 00:44:27" What are the major hazards to spacecraft as it approaches near light speed 00:49:45" Ryan from Delaware has a question about the James Webb space telescope 00:53:19" When James Webb runs out of fuel, what will happen to itFrom the genetic experiments with zebrafish to the puzzling cold spot in the cosmic microwave background, this episode of Space Nuts is packed with fascinating topics that will leave you in awe. Tune in and let your curiosity soar to the farthest reaches of space. Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
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    58m 25s
  • #420: Moon Water & Nemesis: Unveiling Lunar Mysteries and Stellar Theories

    26 MAY 2024 · Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson for another riveting Q&A edition of Space Nuts. This episode dives into some fascinating listener questions that challenge our understanding of space and science.First up, Mikey from Illinois poses a thought-provoking question: Can we drink water from the moon or Mars? Andrew and Fred explore the potential risks and benefits of consuming extraterrestrial water, including the presence of unknown substances and the impact of heavy water isotopes.Next, Sean from Nottingham inquires about the Nemesis theory, asking whether there could be a small sun or neutron star in our solar system, possibly linked to the elusive Planet Nine. Fred delves into the history and current standing of this hypothesis, examining its implications for mass extinctions and the structure of our solar system.Finally, Rusty from Donnybrook raises a question about the Hubble constant and whether the interstellar medium might be affecting the measurements of standard candles, leading to discrepancies in the universe's expansion rate. Fred explains the intricacies of this cosmic conundrum and why astronomers have considered and largely ruled out this possibility. From the safety of lunar water to the mysteries of distant stars and the expanding universe, this episode of Space Nuts promises to ignite your curiosity and expand your cosmic knowledge. Tune in and join the conversation! 00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley answers audience questions on Space Nuts Q and a edition 00:01:29 When we get to moon and Mars, should we drink contaminated water 00:09:32 Fred asks whether small sun in solar system could be planet nine 00:16:32 Recent scientific analysis no longer supports the nemesis hypothesis, NASA says 00:19:13 Is it possible that the interstellar medium is causing standard candles to lose intensity 00:26:51 Fred Watson: Andrew, thanks for hosting the Space Nuts podcast Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. https://www.spacenuts.io   https://www.bitesz.com/show/space-nuts/  Sponsor:   https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    29m 13s
  • #419: Blue Horizons & Fairy Floss Planets: Unveiling the Universe's Softest Secrets

    23 MAY 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this episode of Space Nuts, where they explore a variety of space phenomena that are as intriguing as they are mysterious. Firstly, they discuss Blue Origin's return to the stars with NS-25, a mission that marked a triumphant comeback after technical setbacks. The flight not only signifies Blue Origin's resilience but also the inspirational story of Ed Dwight, the first African-American astronaut candidate, who at 90 years old, set a record as the oldest person to reach space.Next, the conversation lightens with the discovery of a planet with the consistency of fairy floss, also known as cotton candy or candy floss. WASP-193b, a gas giant that defies the norms of density and composition, leaves astronomers scratching their heads. How does a planet become so 'fluffy'? What could it possibly be made of? These are the questions that Andrew and Fred ponder as they delve into the mysteries of planet formation.Lastly, the duo discusses the gravitational wave background in the universe, likening it to the cosmic microwave background radiation. They explore how pulsar timing arrays are providing new insights into the 'hiss' of gravitational waves created by countless cosmic events, offering a deeper understanding of the universe's dynamic fabric.From record-breaking astronauts to cotton candy planets and the cosmic symphony of gravitational waves, this episode of Space Nuts is packed with astronomical wonders that will leave you in awe. Tune in and let your curiosity soar to the farthest reaches of space.00:00:00 This is Space Nuts, where we talk astronomy and space science 00:01:12 Professor Fred Watson discusses eating fairy floss with a moustache 00:02:10 Bright flash in the sky over Europe turned out to be comet 00:05:55 Ed Dwight was the first astronaut of colour to be selected by NASA 00:10:10 This is a newly discovered planet, or newly identified planet 00:17:14 Planet in orbit around red dwarf star 1200 light years away 00:21:06 Fred: Some work is being done on background gravitational waves 00:28:17 Fred Watson: People are fascinated by gravitational waves because of mystery  https://www.bitesz.com/show/space-nuts/support/ and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. Become a supporter of this podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. www.spacenuts.io www.bitesz.com https://www.bitesz.com/show/space-nuts/support/ Sponsor: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    30m 44s
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    #419-420 Premium: Blue Origin's Bounce Back & Fluffy Planets: The Space Menu Expands

    23 MAY 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this episode of Space Nuts, as they delve into the latest space headlines and answer some of the universe's most intriguing questions. First, they discuss the triumphant return of Blue Origin to the skies and the remarkable story of 90-year-old Ed Dwight, who was once selected by President John F. Kennedy as an astronaut candidate and has now finally touched the stars. This historic flight not only marked Blue Origin's comeback but also set a new record for the oldest person to travel to space.Next, the duo examines a peculiar gas giant with the density of fairy floss (or cotton candy, depending on where you hail from). This enigmatic planet, known as WASP-193b, challenges our understanding of planetary formation with its inexplicably low density and prompts a cosmic conundrum: how did it come to be?The conversation then shifts to the gravitational wave background in the universe, a concept likened to the cosmic microwave background radiation but for gravitational waves. Andrew and Fred explore the possibility of a universal hum of gravitational waves, born from the myriad cosmic events that shape our universe.Finally, they tackle audience questions, delving into the drinkability of lunar water, the validity of the Nemesis theory, and the perplexing variations in the Hubble constant. From the latest in space travel to the fluffy mysteries of distant planets and the whispers of gravitational waves, this episode of Space Nuts is a treasure trove of astronomical intrigue. Tune in and let your imagination take flight as we continue to unravel the secrets of the cosmos. 00:00:00 This is Space Nuts, where we talk astronomy and space science 00:01:12 Professor Fred Watson discusses eating fairy floss with a moustache 00:02:10 Flash in the sky over Europe may have been a piece of comet 00:05:01 Blue Origin returns to space with record-breaking NS 25 mission 00:05:55 Ed Dwight was selected in 1961 as an astronaut and astronaut candidate 00:10:12 Newly discovered planet is described as cotton candy with low density 00:17:30 Andrew Dunkley says planet is 1200 light years away from Earth 00:20:59 Some work is being done on background gravitational waves in the universe 00:28:05 Professor Fred Watson says people are fascinated by gravitational waves 00:29:52 We'll answer some audience questions on this edition of Space Nuts 00:30:35 Fred Watson, astronomer at large, joins Andrew on Talk Science 00:31:00 When we get to moon and Mars, should we drink contaminated water 00:38:46 If heavy water reaches 20% of total body water, it could be lethal 00:39:10 Fred asks whether small sun in solar system could be planet nine 00:46:07 Recent scientific analysis no longer supports the nemesis hypothesis, says Shawn Thorn 00:48:36 Is it possible that the interstellar medium is causing standard candles to lose intensity 00:56:14 Andrew Dunkley welcomes Fred Watson to the Space Nuts podcast Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar journey by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to answer the universe's most perplexing questions. Clear skies and boundless curiosity await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. www.spacenuts.io www.bitesz.com https://www.bitesz.com/show/space-nuts/support/ Sponsor www.bitesz.com/nordpass
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    58m 37s
  • #418: From Cosmic Drag to Holographic Hype: Unraveling the Mysteries of Space Travel

    19 MAY 2024 · Prepare to have your mind stretched to the cosmic limits in this Q&A episode of Space Nuts. Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson answer a selection of thought-provoking questions sent in by our curious listeners, tackling the mysteries of light, the concept of a holographic universe, and the challenges of interstellar travel. First up, Alan from Medicine Hat, Canada, wonders how far light from an LED with one candle power can travel before it becomes undetectable by space telescopes. The duo discusses the persistence of light and the factors that influence our ability to observe its journey through the cosmos. Next, Charles probes the perplexing theory of a holographic universe, questioning whether our three-dimensional experience is merely a projection from a two-dimensional boundary. Andrew and Fred unravel the theoretical underpinnings of this mind-bending concept and its implications for our understanding of reality. The conversation then accelerates to relativistic speeds with Craig from sunny Merimbula, NSW, asking how fast a spacecraft must travel before encountering drag in the sparse medium of space. They also consider the potential hazards of high-speed collisions with cosmic dust and gas, pondering the aerodynamic and navigational challenges that would arise. From the eternal voyage of light to the enigmatic nature of our universe and the theoretical speed limits of space travel, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic conundrum of astronomical proportions. Tune in as Andrew and Fred navigate through the universe's most intriguing puzzles. 00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley answers questions about light on this edition of Space Nuts 00:01:38 First question comes from Alan from Medicine Hat, Canada 00:03:44 There is no known limit to how far light can travel 00:06:03 Charles: What do you think of the theory that we live in a holographic universe 00:13:46 If all universes are expanding, would they eventually overlap 00:17:41 Craig Miller calls from sunny Merimbula in New South Wales 00:19:03 How much speed would drag depend on the concentration of particles in space Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar quest by visiting our https://www.bitesz.com/show/space-nuts/support/. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the enigmas of the universe. Clear skies and cosmic queries await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. This episode is brought to you the support of NordPass....the password manager you need in your life to save time and reduce angst. Check out out special deal on pricing (hint....it's really cheap at the moment).... https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass.
    26m 45s
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    #423-424 Premium: Earth-Like Exoplanet & Alien Megastructures: New Frontiers Explored

    6 JUN 2024 · Join Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson for another exciting episode of Space Nuts. This week, we're diving into some stellar discoveries and cosmic conundrums that will leave you starstruck! First up, we explore an Earth-like planet discovered by Australian and Scottish scientists. This exoplanet, located 40 light-years away, sits in the Goldilocks zone of a red dwarf star, making it a tantalising candidate for hosting liquid water. Could this be our new home away from home?Next, we tackle the growing concern of satellite noise and its potential threat to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Fred shares insights from his visit to the UN in Vienna, discussing how astronomers and industry are working together to mitigate this issue. Finally, we delve into the search for Dyson spheres or megastructures in space. An op-ed piece argues why these colossal constructs probably don't exist, but could there still be a chance of finding one? Tune in for these fascinating topics and more on Space Nuts! Visit our website: www.spacenuts.io Check out our sponsor: [Nordpass](https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass) NordVPN: www.nordvpn.com/spacenuts 
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    54m 45s
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    #421-422 Premium: Zebrafish in Space & Cosmic Cold Spots

    30 MAY 2024 · Space Nuts Episode: Zebrafish in Space & Cosmic MysteriesJoin Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they explore the wonders of the universe in this episode of Space Nuts. From the world's smallest astronauts to the mysteries of the cosmic microwave background, this episode promises to ignite your curiosity and expand your cosmic knowledge. Episode Highlights:- Zebrafish in Space: Discover why zebrafish are orbiting in the Chinese space station Tiangong and what their genetic similarity to humans could reveal about long-term space travel. - The Cold Spot Mystery: Dive into the enigma of the cold spot in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Why is it there, and what could it mean for our understanding of the universe? - Vera C. Rubin Telescope: Learn about the delivery of the 3200-megapixel camera to the Vera C. Rubin Observatory and its potential to revolutionise our understanding of the cosmos. 00:00:00" This is space nuts, where we talk astronomy and space science 00:00:56" Professor Fred Watson says the weather is starting to chill down in Britain 00:01:54" The 3200 megapixel camera for the Vera C. Rubin telescope has been delivered 00:07:21" Zebrafish are on a chinese mission exploring effects of space on fish 00:12:46" Scientists trying to make aquariums in space self-sustainable 00:15:20" Fred says there's a cold spot in space caused by cosmic microwave background radiation 00:24:05" Cold spots in the cosmic microwave background radiation are not unusual 00:28:46" Professor Fred Watson with Andrew Dunkley on Space Nuts Q and A 00:30:31" Alan asked how far away could Hubble telescope detect one candle power led 00:34:37" This week's audio question comes from Nate from Queensland 00:35:57" Bolometric brightness is the brightness of something measured over its whole spectrum 00:42:27" Is hawking radiation anything to do with dark matter or dark energy 00:44:27" What are the major hazards to spacecraft as it approaches near light speed 00:49:45" Ryan from Delaware has a question about the James Webb space telescope 00:53:19" When James Webb runs out of fuel, what will happen to itFrom the genetic experiments with zebrafish to the puzzling cold spot in the cosmic microwave background, this episode of Space Nuts is packed with fascinating topics that will leave you in awe. Tune in and let your curiosity soar to the farthest reaches of space. Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar voyage by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the universe. Clear skies and boundless exploration await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
    Play
    58m 25s
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    #419-420 Premium: Blue Origin's Bounce Back & Fluffy Planets: The Space Menu Expands

    23 MAY 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this episode of Space Nuts, as they delve into the latest space headlines and answer some of the universe's most intriguing questions. First, they discuss the triumphant return of Blue Origin to the skies and the remarkable story of 90-year-old Ed Dwight, who was once selected by President John F. Kennedy as an astronaut candidate and has now finally touched the stars. This historic flight not only marked Blue Origin's comeback but also set a new record for the oldest person to travel to space.Next, the duo examines a peculiar gas giant with the density of fairy floss (or cotton candy, depending on where you hail from). This enigmatic planet, known as WASP-193b, challenges our understanding of planetary formation with its inexplicably low density and prompts a cosmic conundrum: how did it come to be?The conversation then shifts to the gravitational wave background in the universe, a concept likened to the cosmic microwave background radiation but for gravitational waves. Andrew and Fred explore the possibility of a universal hum of gravitational waves, born from the myriad cosmic events that shape our universe.Finally, they tackle audience questions, delving into the drinkability of lunar water, the validity of the Nemesis theory, and the perplexing variations in the Hubble constant. From the latest in space travel to the fluffy mysteries of distant planets and the whispers of gravitational waves, this episode of Space Nuts is a treasure trove of astronomical intrigue. Tune in and let your imagination take flight as we continue to unravel the secrets of the cosmos. 00:00:00 This is Space Nuts, where we talk astronomy and space science 00:01:12 Professor Fred Watson discusses eating fairy floss with a moustache 00:02:10 Flash in the sky over Europe may have been a piece of comet 00:05:01 Blue Origin returns to space with record-breaking NS 25 mission 00:05:55 Ed Dwight was selected in 1961 as an astronaut and astronaut candidate 00:10:12 Newly discovered planet is described as cotton candy with low density 00:17:30 Andrew Dunkley says planet is 1200 light years away from Earth 00:20:59 Some work is being done on background gravitational waves in the universe 00:28:05 Professor Fred Watson says people are fascinated by gravitational waves 00:29:52 We'll answer some audience questions on this edition of Space Nuts 00:30:35 Fred Watson, astronomer at large, joins Andrew on Talk Science 00:31:00 When we get to moon and Mars, should we drink contaminated water 00:38:46 If heavy water reaches 20% of total body water, it could be lethal 00:39:10 Fred asks whether small sun in solar system could be planet nine 00:46:07 Recent scientific analysis no longer supports the nemesis hypothesis, says Shawn Thorn 00:48:36 Is it possible that the interstellar medium is causing standard candles to lose intensity 00:56:14 Andrew Dunkley welcomes Fred Watson to the Space Nuts podcast Support Space Nuts and join us on this interstellar journey by visiting our support page. Your contributions help us continue our mission to answer the universe's most perplexing questions. Clear skies and boundless curiosity await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard. www.spacenuts.io www.bitesz.com https://www.bitesz.com/show/space-nuts/support/ Sponsor www.bitesz.com/nordpass
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    58m 37s
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    #417-418 Premium: From Solar Spectacles to Speedy Spacecraft: Pushing Boundaries Beyond the Red Planet

    16 MAY 2024 · Embark on an astronomical odyssey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they delve into the latest celestial phenomena on this episode of Space Nuts. The show kicks off with a discussion on the most intense solar flare in nearly a decade, lighting up the skies with breathtaking auroras and raising concerns about potential impacts on our tech-reliant world. Next, the duo celebrates a Martian milestone: Perseverance rover's 1000 days on the Red Planet. Discover the scientific treasures unearthed by this intrepid explorer, from intriguing rock samples to the pivotal role of its aerial companion, Ingenuity. Then, strap in for a journey through the possibilities of advanced space travel as NASA's innovative plasma rocket concept promises to slash Mars travel time from nine months to a mere two months. Could this be the breakthrough we need for the next giant leap in interplanetary exploration?Finally, peer into the cosmic cradle of a giant protoplanetary disc, the largest ever observed. This discovery could herald the birth of massive new worlds, offering a glimpse into the early stages of planet formation and the boundless potential of the universe.From solar spectacles to Martian marvels and the promise of faster space travel, this episode of Space Nuts is a testament to the relentless pursuit of knowledge that propels humanity beyond the final frontier.00:00:00 Andrew Dunkley talks about budgets and dog issues on this week's Space Nuts 00:02:31 The biggest solar flare in nearly a decade has just passed over the earth 00:06:58 The perseverance rover is now past 1000 days on the red planet 00:14:27 Andrew says he could rerelease audio from World War One book under Australian copyright 00:16:49 A proposed plasma rocket would cut the travel time to Mars to two months 00:24:07 Fred: Have you seen a house before they build it 00:25:45 New observations show giant edge on protoplanetary disc around distant star 00:31:21 Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson answering questions about light 00:33:03 First question comes from Alan from medicine Hat, Canada 00:35:14 There is no known limit to how far light can travel 00:37:33 Charles: What do you think of the theory that we live in a holographic universe 00:44:10 What if the hologram is made of dark matter 00:45:26 If all universes are expanding, would they eventually overlap 00:49:07 Craig Miller calls from sunny Marambula in New South Wales 00:50:30 How much speed can drag create depending on concentration of particles in spaceJoin us on this interstellar voyage by supporting Space Nuts at https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Your contributions help us continue our mission to explore the wonders of the cosmos. Clear skies and bold explorations await on Space Nuts, where we make the cosmos your backyard.
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    58m 11s
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    #415-416 Premium: Starliner's Stumble & Lunar Luminosity: Reflecting on Space's Latest Feats

    9 MAY 2024 · Embark on a cosmic journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they unravel the latest space conundrums on Space Nuts. In this episode, they delve into the trials and tribulations of Boeing's Starliner – a spacecraft that's faced its fair share of setbacks. Will the next launch finally see it dock with the International Space Station, or will the stars remain out of reach for this ambitious vessel?The duo also sheds light on an innovative concept to illuminate the Moon's dark craters using mirrors. Could this ingenious solution unlock the Moon's potential as a base for future space exploration?From Earth's orbit, they turn their gaze to satellites that do more than just circle our planet – they predict crop yields, an advancement that could revolutionize agriculture, especially in the face of climate change.And finally, Space Nuts celebrates a special anniversary – ten years of the High Precision Polarimetric Instrument (HIPPI). Discover how this small yet mighty device has transformed our understanding of distant magnetic fields and even the potential to detect rainbows on exoplanets.Join Andrew and Fred as they tackle these topics and more, providing insights that only seasoned space enthusiasts can offer. It's an episode not to be missed by anyone who looks up at the night sky with wonder.00:00:00 - Andrew Dunkley hosts Space Nuts podcast about astronomy and space science 00:01:33 - Launch of Boeing's Starliner scheduled for Friday has been scrubbed 00:04:49 - Andrew Webb: There's a lot of interest in the moon right now 00:10:47 - Professor Fred Watson: There is a valley in Norway that doesn't see sun 00:15:19 - Hippo is an acronym for high precision, um, polarimetric instrument 00:16:28 - Hippy was first used on the Anglo australian telescope 00:24:56 - Hippy is capable of detecting rainbows in atmospheres of exoplanets 00:25:54 - Use of satellites to predict crop yields is becoming increasingly feasible 00:32:14 - Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson on Space nuts 00:33:51 - Robert from the Netherlands says black holes may have magnetic fields 00:40:25 - Three questions from Pete Ellinger about different star types across galaxies 00:46:34 - Metallicity, the amount of iron in a star, varies across galaxies 00:48:08 - Michael from Kent asks Professor Watson what project stood out for him most 00:56:39 - Yeah, that's one of the good ones are. It's a bit like hippie 00:56:56 - Fred asks why fog bows are white and not a rainbow
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    1h 1m 59s
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    #413-414 Premium: Hubble's Hiccups & The Gamma Ray Enigma: Deciphering the Universe's Luminous Puzzles

    2 MAY 2024 · Embark on an astronomical journey with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson in this captivating episode of Space Nuts. The cosmic conundrum that is the Hubble Space Telescope faces familiar challenges once again, with its gyroscopes causing a stir and casting it into safe mode. Fred delves into the history and potential future of this venerable eye in the sky, as NASA engineers contemplate a future where Hubble may have to operate at a reduced efficiency.Next, the duo spins into a discussion about the fastest rotating asteroid ever observed, 2024 BX1, which hurtled towards Earth and disintegrated in our atmosphere, leaving behind a trail of clues for scientists to unravel. With a rotation period clocked at an astonishing 2.588 seconds, this space rock set a new record and provided a meteoric spectacle for those fortunate enough to witness its fiery demise.Finally, Andrew and Fred explore the enigmatic world of gamma ray bursts, those fleeting yet fiercely powerful cosmic events that have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in 1967. A new breakthrough hints at the possibility that these bursts are not only symmetrical but may also be the result of laterally moving jets, offering a tantalizing glimpse into the mechanics of these astronomical phenomena.From the trials and tribulations of the Hubble to the rapid revolutions of an asteroid and the perplexing properties of gamma ray bursts, this episode of Space Nuts is a cosmic voyage through the mysteries of space. Tune in to unravel the universe's most intriguing puzzles and remember, the cosmos is always full of surprises.00:00:00 - Coming up on this episode of Space nuts is Hubble having trouble again 00:02:32 - Gyroscopes are what let Hubble telescope point in the right direction 00:07:38 - An asteroid was detected 3 hours before it hit the earth's atmosphere 00:14:06 - Professor Fred Watson says four polish meteorite hunters found some fragments 00:15:45 - Gamma ray bursts were discovered accidentally in 1967 but scientists have been studying them since 00:20:16 - Gamma ray bursts also have light curves which are completely symmetrical 00:26:45 - Fred: I'm still trying to get my head around these things 00:28:54 - Professor Fred Watson answers questions from James, lloyd and Ron 00:29:50 - Kate and Jeremy met Andrew and Fred on the Canadian train for the eclipse 00:31:31 - Fred Watson: Get your iPad to read book rather than struggling through it 00:34:03 - Planet nine, should such a thing be discovered? Does the individual get a say 00:40:53 - Do normal everyday stars like our sun ever collide and what do they create 00:44:43 - Do galaxies as a whole have electromagnetism 00:51:13 - If scientists in distant solar system were searching for exoplanets using modern technology 00:58:44 - Andrew Dunster: Thanks to everyone who sent questions inSupport the podcast and expand your knowledge of the universe by visiting https://www.spreaker.com/podcast/space-nuts--2631155/support. Subscribe for more celestial insights with Space Nuts, where every episode brings you closer to the stars. Until our next stellar encounter, keep your eyes on the skies and your curiosity ever-expanding.
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    1h 19s
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    #411-412 Premium: Aussie Astronaut, Cosmic Canopies & Methane Magic: Probing the Puzzles of Planetary Phenomena

    25 APR 2024 · Embark on an interstellar journey with host Andrew Dunkley and the sagacious Professor Fred Watson on this enlightening episode of Space Nuts. This week, we celebrate a monumental achievement in Australia's space exploration history with the announcement of the nation's first female astronaut, Catherine Bennell Pegg. Discover her journey to the stars and the rigorous process that led to this historic moment. The duo then sets their sights closer to home, delving into the volcanic wonders of Jupiter's moon, Io. Revel in the descriptions of a lava lake so vast it rivals earthly seas and a mountain so sharply defined it could be mistaken for an earthly cathedral spire. Juno's flybys have brought us face-to-face with these alien landscapes, challenging our understanding of geological processes beyond Earth. Next, we navigate the swirling mysteries of Jupiter itself, exploring the enigmatic water content—or surprising lack thereof—in the gas giant's atmosphere. What does this mean for our understanding of Jupiter's formation and the early solar system? Andrew and Fred unpack the cosmic implications. Finally, the episode takes a speculative turn to Mars, where a curious new theory suggests that human activity might be influencing the detection of methane on the Red Planet. Could our rovers be unearthing secrets from beneath the Martian crust? The discussion probes the depths of this intriguing possibility. From the triumph of human ambition to the perplexing puzzles of our cosmic neighborhood, this episode of Space Nuts is a testament to the relentless pursuit of knowledge. Tune in for these astronomical adventures and ponder the mysteries that await us in the vast expanse of space. Remember to submit your own cosmic conundrums via the Space Nuts website, and join us next time as we continue our voyage through the wonders of the universe. Until then, let curiosity be your guide, and keep your eyes to the skies! And for your daily dose of the latest Space News, check out the team at 'Astronomy Daily the Podcast'. Available wherever you get podcasts or stream from their website at https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/
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    54m 2s
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    #409-410 Premium: Eclipses, Auroras, and the Stellar Black Hole Record Breaker

    18 APR 2024 · Prepare to journey through the cosmos with Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson as they explore a plethora of astronomical wonders in this thrilling episode of Space Nuts. First on the docket is Fred's captivating recount of his US adventure, where he witnessed eclipses, marveled at rocket launches, and even encountered space nuts fans under the aurora-lit skies of Whitehorse. But not all space encounters are awe-inspiring; the duo also discusses the rare and unnerving event of space junk crashing through a Floridian's roof. The episode's highlight is a deep dive into the discovery of the most massive stellar black hole yet found in our galaxy, a mind-boggling 33 times the mass of our Sun. This cosmic behemoth, found lurking a mere 2,000 light-years away, challenges our understanding of stellar evolution and the formation of black holes. Join Andrew and Fred as they traverse these astronomical landscapes, unpacking the complexities and marveling at the wonders of the universe. From the breathtaking experiences of witnessing a total eclipse to the potential dangers of space debris, this episode is a testament to the ever-evolving story of our cosmos. Episode Chapters (00:00) Professor Fred Watson returns from trip to North America fully jet lagged (02:40) Fred Watson uses his iPhone to take photographs of aurora in Canada (06:33) Fred Watson went to Houston for the total solar eclipse in 1970 (11:27) Andrew says SpaceX Falcon nine rocket launched from Florida on Tuesday (15:34) A gentleman in Naples, Florida had something come through his roof (17:52) Talking about the Kennedy space flight centre has just reminded me of one of highlights (18:33) Life size replica of Hubble space telescope at Kennedy Space Centre (22:50) Most massive stellar black hole yet found in our galaxy (24:25) Scientists detect massive black hole in Milky Way using NASA's Gaia mission (30:27) This is space nuts. Andrew Dunkley with Professor Fred Watson (31:14) Hello, Fred. How you been since I saw you last 5 seconds time ago (32:06) Jose from California thinks black holes could explain many mysteries of the universe (39:34) Black holes could be the source of dark energy, Jose says (42:31) Question from Alan asks whether supernovae are always or at all creators of gold (45:53) Fred: Is it becoming more likely that Earth is totally unique in universe (50:59) Fred: I've got a couple of hypotheticals for James (54:30) Thank you to everyone who's sending questions. Don't forget to keep them coming
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    56m 22s
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    #407-408 Premium: Cosmic Conundrums & Volcanic Ventures: Unraveling the Universe's Expansion & Mars' Hidden Fire Mountain

    11 APR 2024 · Prepare to have your mind expanded to the farthest reaches of the cosmos in this mind-boggling episode of Space Nuts. Andrew Dunkley, your host, and the ever-enlightening Professor Fred Watson are here to unravel the mysteries of the universe's expansion speed and to reveal a colossal discovery that's been hiding on the Red Planet. First, we dive into the cosmic conundrum that's been baffling astronomers: the expansion speed of the universe. With new data from the James Webb Space Telescope affirming previous Hubble Space Telescope findings, we're left with two conflicting speeds of cosmic expansion. The debate heats up as we explore the possibility of unknown physics at play in the vast expanse of space. Could we be on the brink of a breakthrough that reshapes our understanding of the cosmos? Next, we set our sights on Mars, where a giant volcano has been discovered. Not just any volcano, but one that's been hiding in plain sight. This behemoth, now known as the Noctis Volcano, stands over 9,000 meters tall and stretches 450 kilometers in diameter. Join us as we discuss the potential of this Martian marvel for future exploration and the intriguing evidence of ancient glacial ice hidden beneath its surface. From the perplexing pace of universal expansion to Martian volcanic giants, this episode is a cosmic journey like no other. So, strap in and join us as we explore these celestial revelations. Subscribe to Space Nuts and be part of our interstellar community, always curious and ever in awe of the universe's endless wonders. Until next time, keep your telescopes poised and your imaginations ready for the next cosmic discovery! ? Episode Chapters (00:00) Andrew Dunkley introduces the universe's expansion speed mystery (02:34) Fred Watson discusses the James Webb Space Telescope findings (07:45) The Hubble tension and the quest for new physics (12:22) Discovery of a giant volcano on Mars (17:36) Potential landing sites and ancient glacial ice on Mars (22:50) Audience Q&A about supernovae, 3D printed telescopes, and Voyager missions (29:10) Zane's idea for a space-based particle collider
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    51m 8s
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    #405-406 Premium: Probing Ancient Life on the Red Planet & Discovering the Tiniest Exoplanet

    4 APR 2024 · Discover the cosmic curiosities lurking within the Martian landscape and the celestial dance of distant stars in this episode of Space Nuts with your hosts Andrew Dunkley and Professor Fred Watson. Embark on a journey to the Red Planet, where a new study unveils tantalizing evidence that ancient Mars may have been ripe for life. Delve into the chemistry of bygone Martian atmospheres and the intriguing presence of formaldehyde, a potential precursor to life-sustaining molecules. Could this be the clue we've been waiting for in our quest to uncover Martian life? Then, strap in for an interstellar detour to the HD 110067 system, a cosmic spectacle featuring a harmonious sextet of exoplanets and a dance of stars bound by gravity's embrace. Andrew and Fred unravel the mysteries of how a distant binary star system, 13,400 AU away, remains gravitationally tethered to its primary star, maintaining its status in the celestial waltz as a triple star system. Our space explorers also tackle your burning questions, from the feasibility of capturing clear images from a spacecraft hurtling past Proxima Centauri at a fraction of light speed, to the gravitational choreography that determines the orbits of planets around their stars. And for those pondering the possibilities of moons having their own moons, prepare for a lesson on the delicate balance required for such a cosmic configuration to exist. So, join us as we traverse the expanse of space, from the dusty red plains of Mars to the far reaches of the galaxy, where star systems defy the odds. Don't forget to send your own stellar inquiries for a chance to be part of our galactic dialogue. Subscribe to Space Nuts on your favorite podcast platform, and let's continue our celestial adventure together. Until next episode, keep your eyes on the skies and your questions at the ready! For more Space Nuts visit https://www.spacenuts.io 📋 Episode Chapters (00:00) Andrew Dunkley: This is Space nuts. Thanks for joining us (01:10) You used to be an astronomer in charge. Well, had to redesignate you (01:33) Fred has just returned from a trip to Egypt, and he's excited (05:48) The new Cairo is going to essentially brighten up its skies to the extent (08:41) New research suggests ancient Mars could have harboured life (16:07) Scientists have now discovered the smallest exoplanet ever found (26:46) We'd love to get your questions answered at Space. com. Uh, you can do that (27:49) Viano from Florence, Italy, has two questions for us (29:33) Having been in Florence recently, what an amazing place you live in (30:10) Andrew Viano: Breakthrough project aims to send micro spacecraft to Alpha Centauri (36:22) The ANa has raised doubts about whether a space camera is feasible (38:38) Vienna's question was about the orbits of planets (40:03) Fred Watson asks Andrew Dunkley if a moon could have a moon (44:03) Scott from Oregon questions whether companion binary system is actually triple star system (49:30) Hubble's lifetime will eventually be limited because its gyroscopes have failed
    Play
    53m 19s

Join Professor Fred Watson, world-renowned Astronomer at Large, and Sci-Fi Author and Broadcaster Andrew Dunkley, on their captivating podcast, Space Nuts. Dive into the vast universe of space, astronomy and...

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Join Professor Fred Watson, world-renowned Astronomer at Large, and Sci-Fi Author and Broadcaster Andrew Dunkley, on their captivating podcast, Space Nuts. Dive into the vast universe of space, astronomy and astrophysics as they discuss the latest news, exciting space travel adventures, groundbreaking discoveries, and unravel the enduring mysteries of the cosmos. This engaging series offers a unique blend of expert insights and imaginative storytelling and listener input, making it a must-listen for space enthusiasts and science fiction fans alike.

Two episodes a week with news and explainer focused editions published on Thursday's and our Listener Q&A focused edition on Monday's.
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